Sign Language – be careful or you might get lost in translation (part two)

Here are two other of the most common gestures along with their meaning.

Okay
Made by using thumb and forefinger in the shape of the letter O, this gesture is mainly used in underwater diving to say they're OK, in countries like USA and UK this gesture is also used to say someone what a delicious meal they've made (you know it's rude to talk with your mouth full). There are however some countries, such as Brazil, Germany, as well as some of the Mediterranean countries where this sign is used to insult someone, calling them a 'zero' or the more cynical 'asshole' and even 'homosexual'.
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Sign Language – be careful or you might get lost in translation (part one)

You may think that the sign language is a universal tool for communication all over the world. Well, that's not quite right. It may help you to get closer to new culture, to express your thoughts and talk without using words, but it can also cause you a great deal of problems if you accidentally insult someone in whose culture signs don't have the meaning you are used to.

So, when you are somewhere abroad, be careful with the air-sawing, because you can get yourself in a pretty awkward, uncomfortable, and even hostile situation. Bulgarians, as typical hot-blooded Balkan people, have it in their nature to talk with their hands. It's not like that everywhere, though. Some people are more collected; others use facial expressions more often and third are even more expressive than us. The signs are in some way like the nodding of the head for 'yes' and 'no', which differs in the different countries.
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WORD OF THE YEAR 2012

The Oxford University Press selected "omnishambles" as the word of the year 2012. The precise definition of the word is "a situation that has been comprehensively mismanaged, characterised by a string of blunders and miscalculations".

Each year the Oxford University Press monitors how the English language is changing and selects a word that best describes the spirit of the year. Usually it chooses different words for British and American English.
This year the winner for America is "gif" – abbreviation for an image file format used for images on the internet. The word "omnishambles" was coined by the script-writers of the satirical TV show "The Thick of It". It is already used for everything from state PR blunders to the Olympics preparation abounding in crises.
"Omnishambles" was chosen from a shortlist including words such as "mummy porn" – the genre of "Fifty shades" bestsellers, "green-on-blue" – military attacks made by forces regarded as neutral, for example attacks by Afghanistan army or police against foreign military forces. The Olympics offered shortlisters such as "to medal" and the victory dance of runner Mo Farah – "Mobot".
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Translation of business documentation

One of the key for a successful business is communication. And as a communication tool, translation can also play a vital role in the development of your business. The quality of business documents translation has its specifics and depends on several factors — timely execution, broad scope of translation languages and precise performance. There also is a set of requirements for the performance of the translation project to be followed regardless of the size of the project. Such translation needs to be performed accurate, on time, correct and to comply with the background business, legal etc. frame. Business translations are also characterized by the short deadlines, but that in no way must affect the quality of the translated text. Sometimes business translation covers wide range of translation services — translation, legalization, localization, desktop publishing etc.

Translation Agency arte.doc works with a team of experienced professionals (translators, editors, proofreaders etc.) that can carry out any business documentation order. We work with clients from all business levels — from small through medium-sized business to government agencies and ministries. We are also ISO 9001:2008 and with that ensure that your order will be processed on first class quality level.

BULGARIAN TRADITIONS AND CUSTOMS – NEW YEAR’S EVE

New Year's Eve is considered as one of the prominent times of the year. Everyone walks with a smile on their faces, enthusiastic and excited for the upcoming celebration. A great part of people choose to celebrate away from home, near the sea or up in the mountain, also in all types of party places. Others prefer to gather friends and family at home and to welcome the New Year in coziness.

Different cultural an sports event are also being held at this time of year – there are many music concerts, carnivals, processions, bazaars, etc.
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BULGARIAN TRADITIONS AND CUSTOMS – CHRISTMAS

Christmas is one of the greatest Christian holidays. It celebrates the birth of Jesus, the Saviour. It also has pagan roots, since it was noticed that at that time of year the days start growing again, i.e. the sun is born again. In time the holiday changed its customs and meanings. The Church chose to blend the celebration of Jesus' birth with the old traditions to establish and strengthen the Christian values and morals.

The Christmas celebrations begin on December 24th and end on December 26th.
December 24th is also called Small Christmas (Christmas Eve), December 25th – Great Christmas, and December 26th is the holiday of Jesus' family.
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BULGARIAN TRADITIONS AND CUSTOMS – CHRISTMAS EVE

Christmas Eve is one of the most important family holidays in Bulgarian calendar. Its celebrating includes many rituals, both Christian and pagan, with which to bring luck and a fruitful year for the family.

According to Bulgarian tradition the family should gather for the holiday and each member has a role. Men choose and cut down the Yule log – a large oak or pear log symbolizing the world tree (keeper of order and harmony in the world). The eldest of the men sets it on fire and it's left to burn all night. That fire is believed to have purifying and protective power. Part of the ash is spread on the fields to bring fertility, and other is kept for protection against evil powers.
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How many types of interpretation do you know? Part II

As we promised you in part I, we continue to surprise you with the different types of interpreting services.

What is Asymmetric interpretation?

All delegates speak in their mother tongue, but listen to interpretation into only a few languages.

In many cases, delegates understand one or (more) widely spoken languages, but do not feel comfortable speaking in it. One way to make a scarce resource (interpreters) go further is to use asymmetric interpretation.
A team interpreting back and forth between the current official languages requires 69 or more interpreters, but if you limit the active languages to three, you can get by with only a dozen or so interpreters. Delegates can all speak their mother tongue, but they can listen to only one of the three languages.
Naturally, for asymmetric interpretation to be feasible you need to be sure all delegates understand one or more of the active languages.

Definition: European Commission, Directorate General for Interpretation
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How many types of interpretation do you know? Part I

We can assure you, at the end of this article you'll be more than surprise of the many (many, many) types of interpretation that exist today. So, let's begin...

What is consecutive interpreting?

Interpreting after the speaker has finished

The interpreter sits with the delegates, listens to the speech and renders it, at the end, in a different language, generally with the aid of notes. In the modern world consecutive interpreting has been largely replaced by simultaneous, but it remains relevant for certain kinds of meetings (e.g. highly technical meetings, working lunches, small groups, field trips).
Well-trained interpreters can render speeches of 10 minutes or more with great accuracy.

Definition: European Commission, Directorate General for Interpretation
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Interpretation Terminology

Since we find the interpretation an interesting, yet relatively unknown subject we decided to unveil a little bit more of it by giving you some basic terminology.

Active Language: The language the interpreters speak that delegates can listen to.

Active A-Language: The interpreter's native language (or another language strictly equivalent to a native language), into which the interpreter works from all her or his other languages in both modes of interpretation, simultaneous and consecutive.
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